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TBI FACT SHEET

SCI FACT SHEET

CHILDREN & YOUTH TBI FACT SHEET

NEUROBEHAVIORAL FACT SHEET



 

Facts About Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)

 

 At least 5.3 million Americans have a long-term disability as a result of TBI

 

Traumatic brain injuries, by definition, are sustained as a result of blunt or penetrating trauma or acceleration-deceleration forces, and are typically associated with a decreased level of consciousness, amnesia, other neurological or neuropsychological abnormalities, skull fracture, or diagnosed intracranial lesions.  These impairments may be either temporary or permanent and can result in partial or total functional disability. TBI does not refer to degenerative or congenital conditions.

 

a. According to the Brain Injury Association of America (BIAA), there are nearly seven times more incidences of traumatic brain injury each year than diagnoses of breast cancer and HIV/AIDS combined.

 

b. 1.4 million Americans—475,000 of them children—sustain TBIs each year.  That’s one injury every 21 seconds.  (Centers for Disease Control & Prevention)        

 

 c. The leading causes TBI in Georgia in 2008 were:

  • Falls (49.88%)
  • Motor Vehicle Crashes (24.36%)
  • Being struck by an object or person (14.3%)
  • Violence (11/4%)

 d. Direct medical costs and indirect costs (such as lost productivity) associated with TBI are estimated at $60 billion annually.  This number does not take into account returning military service personnel with TBI.  (www.biausa.org)

 

Top Needs of People with TBI:

Based on requests from Trust Fund applicants in FY 2009, the top needs of people with TBI are:

  1. Transportation
  2. Personal support services
  3. Vocational support

 

TBI Resources:

 

a. Brain Injury Association of Georgia, www.braininjurygeorgia.org - (404) 712-5504

 

b. National Brain Injury Information Center (BIAA), www.biausa.org - (800) 444-6443

 

c. Agewise/Gateway Connection, www.agewiseconnection.com - (404) 463-3333, (800) 676-2433

 

d. Brain and Spinal Injury Trust Fund Commission, www.bsitf.state.ga.us - (404) 651-5112, (888) 233-5760

The Trust Fund:

 

The mission of the Brain and Spinal Injury Trust Fund Commission is to enhance the lives of Georgians with traumatic brain and spinal cord injuries.  Guided by the aspirations of people with traumatic injuries, the Commission supports lives of meaning, independence, and inclusion.  As the states Lead Agency on Traumatic Injuries, we:

  • Administer the Central Registry to identify those who are injured
  • Distribute resources through the Trust Fund, and
  • Advocate for improvements in statewide services

     

      The Trust Fund has awarded over $13 million to more than 1,500 Georgians with brain and/or spinal injuries since 2002.

 

      To learn more about the Trust Fund, or to find additional information on TBI and read about important legislative issues and upcoming initiatives for people with traumatic injuries, visit the Commission's web site at www.bsitf.state.ga.us.

 



Facts About Spinal Cord Injury (SCI)

 

Traumatic spinal cord injuries, by definition, are sustained as a result of blunt or penetrative trauma or acceleration-deceleration forces.  SCI causes paraplegia or quadriplegia/tetraplegia, and can indicate a partial or total loss of physical function; it does not refer to degenerative or congenital conditions.

 

In Georgia, 865 individuals were treated for SCI at hospitals in 2007 and 2008, according to the Central Registry for Traumatic Brain & Spinal Injuries, administered by the Brain & Spinal Injury Trust Fund Commission. The prevalence rates by region are:

 

Region 1 (Northwest corner)

80

Region 6 (Augusta area)

64

Region 2 (North central)

46

Region 7 (Columbus area)

45

Region 3 (Atlanta area)

256

Region 8 (Valdosta area)

54

Region 4 (Carrollton area)

72

Region 9 (Savannah area)

111

Region 5 (Central Georgia)

76

Region 10 (Athens area)

61

 

 
Yearly costs (health care and living expenses directly attributable to SCI) can range from $218,000 to over $741,000 in the first year and $15,000 to over $132,000 each subsequent year, depending on the severity of the injury. This does not include indirect costs such as losses in wage and fringe benefits for the injured person. (National Spinal Cord Injury Statistical Center, 2006).

 

National Average Yearly Injury-Related Expenses For Persons With Spinal Cord Injury

Note:  Per the US Census, the 2005 median annual income in Georgia was $44,439.

 

Severity of Injury

First Year

Each Subsequent Year

High Tetraplegia (C1-C4)

$741,425

$132,807

Low Tetraplegia (C5-C8)

$478,782

$54,400

Paraplegia

$270,913

$27,568

Incomplete Motor Function at any Level

$218,504

$15,313

 

 
In Georgia, males sustained 82% of all SCIs in 2008. Estimates from the National Spinal Injury Database (2000) indicate that the percentage nationwide is 78%.

 
Nationally, more than half of all spinal cord injuries are sustained between the ages of 16 and 30.  (National Spinal Injury Database, 2000)

 

 Average estimated lifetime costs for an injured person range from $472,392 to over $2.9 million, depending on the severity of the injury and the age at which the injury was sustained. (National Spinal Cord Injury Statistical Center, 2006)

 

 

 

Most-Requested Areas of Assistance From the Commission:  

Based on requests from Trust Fund applicants in FY2009, people with SCI most frequently applied for assistance with:

  1. Transportation
  2. Personal Support Services
  3. Computers

SCI Resources:

National Spinal Cord Injury Association, www.spinalcord.org - (800) 962-9629

Statewide Independent Living Council of Georgia, www.silcga.org - (770) 270-6860

Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation, www.ChristopherReeve.org - (800) 225-0292

Agewise/Gateway Connection, www.agewiseconnection.com - (404) 463-3333, (800) 676-2433

Brain and Spinal Injury Trust Fund Commission, www.bsitf.state.ga.us - (404) 651-5112, (888) 233-5760

  

The Trust Fund

 

The mission of the Brain and Spinal Injury Trust Fund Commission is to enhance the lives of Georgians with traumatic brain and spinal cord injuries. Guided by the aspirations of people with traumatic injuries, the Commission supports lives of meaning, independence, and inclusion. We:

  • Administer the Central Registry to identify and contact those who are injured
  • Distribute resources through the Trust Fund, and
  • Advocate for improvements in statewide services.

 

The Trust Fund has provided over $13 million to more than 1,500 Georgians with brain and/or spinal injuries since 2002. 

 

To learn more about the Trust Fund, or to find additional information on SCI and read about important legislative issues and upcoming initiatives for people with traumatic injuries, visit the Commission's Web site at www.bsitf.state.ga.us.